Delgatie Castle Chapel, Turriff

National Grid Reference (NGR): NJ 75400 50500, map


Address

Delgatie Castle, Turriff
Aberdeenshire
AB53 5TD
Scotland

Introduction

Delgatie Castle is a fairly substantial domestic castle, built in the 1570s. It is surrounded by a small designed landscape and gardens and there are arable fields and coniferous woodland surrounding the grounds. The castle had its own private chapel, which was at the east end of the main block. A narrow, single-storey extension from the tower joins the chapel, and stone from the chapel may have been used in the construction of this extension. Only the south gable of the chapel now survives, which remains in good condition. 


Description

The chapel was a small, rectangular building, constructed in fine red sandstone ashlar with lime rendered infills. The surviving south gable, 4 metres wide, has a large central Norman-style round arch, which has been infilled to the rear and made into a monumental seating area. The arch has fine moulded arch stones (voussoirs) and hoodmould and above is a heraldic panel with carved shields and memorial plaque. The gable has concave-shaped curved skews, which may be a later rebuild to convert the chapel remains into a monument. A large stone cross is mounted on the apex and is likely original to the chapel. Carved urn finials sit on the flat skew ends, although it is unclear whether they are original or later embellishments. 


Events:

  • Castle and chapel built (1570 to 1579)

Archive References:

NameReferenceNotes
Scottish Church Heritage Research Archive - Offline databaseReference: 10016
Canmore - Online database View Canmore Report Online: RCAHMS NJ75SE 4:00
Canmore - Online database View Canmore Report Online: 19251

Bibliographic References:

NameAuthorDateNotes
'Craig Castle and the Kirk of Auchindoir, Aberdeenshire', in Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, vol.64W D Simpson1930p82-5
The castellated and domestic architecture of Scotland from the twelfth to the eighteenth centuriesD MacGibbon and T Ross1887-92Vol. II, p52