Kirriemuir Baptist Church

National Grid Reference (NGR): NO 38600 53942, map


Address

Bank Street
Kirriemuir
DD8 4BD
Scotland

Introduction

Kirriemuir Baptist Church is a small place of worship, occupying a first floor premises on Bank Street, above a shop. An alley way leads along the east side of the building. The rear of the building backs onto the grounds of Kirriemuir Old Parish Church.


Description (exterior)

The north elevation of the church faces Bank Street and is above a commercial premises (in 2010 an opticians). There is a central gabled section with tall lancet windows and a rose window, all with pronounced hoodmoulds. The sides of the gable is buttressed. The north elevation is built from red sandstone ashlar masonry.

 

The rest of the building is built from rubble and roughly-cut sandstone blocks. The rear of the church has a rose window and various rectangular windows and doors, with those on the ground floor all bricked up. The Baptist church occupies the first storey of the rear elevation.


Description (interior)

The interior of the church is contained on the first floor of the building, with private property and a shop below. The chancel area of the church is at the south end, and is framed by the round window in the south gable, which is splayed within to spread the light across the interior. Below the window is a pointed-arch recess with a decorative plaster hoodmould above. There is a small pulpit placed in front of this central recess, on a raised platform or stage. A small communion table is in front and below the pulpit. 

 

The nave area has simple woden pews, divided by two passages. There are slender arcade arches towards the sides, which create two narrow aisles, in which are more pews. It does not appear the arcades are structural to the building, although they may support the plaster ceiling. The north gable has a large three-light window with small, clear, frosted glass panes. The window has sandstone ashlar masonry.


Archive References:

NameReferenceNotes
Scottish Church Heritage Research Archive - Offline databaseReference: 1032