St. Sirus' Church and St. Ninian's Chapel

National Grid Reference (NGR): NO 39900 11600, map


Address

3 Kirk Brae
Ceres
Fife
KY15 5NA
Scotland

Introduction

RCHAMS Canmore database records the existence of two religious buildings on the site of the present parish church at Ceres (site 3700), though it is probable that St. Ninian's was actually an altar within St. Sirus'. Little is known about these sites. St. Sirus' was probably a cruciform building, oriented east-west. All that remains of the church is the Lindsay Vault in Ceres Churchyard, which was probably attached to the church in the seventeenth century.


Description (exterior)

St. Sirus' Church and St. Ninian's Chapel

Construction materials: Slate - Used for the roof; Stone (rubble, bound) - Used for the walls;

An entry in RCHAMS Canmore database dating to the mid nineteenth century records that St. Sirus' Church and St. Ninian's Chapel were both under the same roof, suggesting that St. Ninian was worshipped at an altar within St. Sirus'. This church was situated on the site of the current kirk at Ceres. It was a cruciform building, orientated east-west. All that remains above ground is the Lindsey Vault, which was attached to the church in the seventeenth century.

Writing in the late nineteenth century, John Dick Peddie describes the discovery of a crucifix in the graveyard of the church, which was probably buried at the time of the Reformation.

A thirteenth century figure of Christ has also been found which may have come from Limoges in France.

Lindsay Vault

Construction materials: Slate - Used for the roof; Stone (sandstone) - Used for the walls;

This vault stands in the churchyard of the present parish church of Ceres, but was probably attached to the medieval kirk prior to its demolition. It is built of coursed sandstone and has a bellcast, slate roof.
A small square building, an aisle formerly attached to the earlier church, it seems to have been extended a little on the west where he aisle adjoined the earlier church. The west wall had been blocked up after the church was demolished. The masonry shows signs of disturbance asa result of changes over time.


Description (interior)

Inside the vault are sixteenth century memorials. There is evidence on the west wall that the roof has been raised and an opening has been blocked.


People / Organisations:

NameRoleDatesNotes
Pre-reformation Church of ScotlandDenomination11C-1560The crucifix which was found on the churchyard has been dated to the mid to late twelfth century.
Church of ScotlandDenomination1560-1806CThe church was probably demolished shortly before the construction of the current building in 1806.

Events:

  • Church: Build/construction (1150c)
    There has been a church on this site since at least the twelfth century.
  • Vault: Build/construction (16c0)
    The vault was probably erected in the early seventeenth century.

Archive References:

NameReferenceNotes
Historic Scotland Listed Building Reports - Online databaseView HS Listing Online: 2365
Canmore - Online database View Canmore Report Online: 31514
Canmore - Online database View Canmore Report Online: 223521

Bibliographic References:

NameAuthorDateNotes
History of CeresStevenson, S.Reached via the 'Tour Scotland' Website http://www.fife.50megs.com/ceres-history.htm
Buildings of Scotland: FifeGifford, J1988p. 123
\'Notice of a crucifix of bronze, enamelled, found in the churchyard of CeresPeddie, J.D.1882-83