St Columba's (Gaelic) C of S

National Grid Reference (NGR): NS 58230 65630, map


Address

300 St Vincent Street, Glasgow
300 St Vincent Street
Glasgow
Lanark
G2
Scotland

Introduction

St Columba's (Gaelic) Church of Scotland was built on the present site in 1904.

Its extravagant facade is mainly down to the large compensation it recieved from the Caledonian Railway Company, who bought the former site in Hope Street to make way for Central Station (the main train station in Glasgow).

The church was built to meet the needs of the Gaelic-speaking people who had fled the poverty of the Highlands in search of employment in Glasgows' busy factories and docks.

Because of both its Gaelic connections and its size it is popularly known as 'The Highland Cathedral'.

The church still has a service in Gaelic every Sunday (at 10am), as well as three weekly services in English.

Its elaborate, sandstone facade has four main sections: The 200 ft tower on the corner, the gable end towards the street on the main body of the church, an octagonal vestry and a hall. Each element of the building is supported by buttresses.

The grand windows are art-nouveau inspired and feature elaborate detailing.

Above the main door is the gaelic inscription- 'Tigh mo chridhe, Tigh mo ghraidh' (House of my heart, House of my love).

It also includes a sculpted burning bush and the inscription, 'Nec tamen consumebatur' (Nor was it consumed). This is not only a reference to the Bible's Old testament story of the Burning Bush, but the image of the Burning Bush is also an emblem of the Church of Scotland.

Continuing up the tower, there is a statue of St Columba. The statue is supported by an angel who carries a banner inscribed with 'Columba'.


Description

St Columba's (Gaelic) C of S

St Columba's (Gaelic) Church of Scotland was built on the present site in 1904.

Its extravagant facade is mainly down to the large compensation it recieved from the Caledonian Railway Company, who bought the former site in Hope Street to make way for Central Station (the main train station in Glasgow).

The church was built to meet the needs of the Gaelic-speaking people who had fled the poverty of the Highlands in search of employment in Glasgows' busy factories and docks.

Because of both its Gaelic connections and its size it is popularly known as 'The Highland Cathedral'.

The church still has a service in Gaelic every Sunday (at 10am), as well as three weekly services in English.

Its elaborate, sandstone facade has four main sections: The 200 ft tower on the corner, the gable end towards the street on the main body of the church, an octagonal vestry and a hall. Each element of the building is supported by buttresses.

The grand windows are art-nouveau inspired and feature elaborate detailing.

Above the main door is the gaelic inscription- 'Tigh mo chridhe, Tigh mo ghraidh' (House of my heart, House of my love).

It also includes a sculpted burning bush and the inscription, 'Nec tamen consumebatur' (Nor was it consumed). This is not only a reference to the Bible's Old testament story of the Burning Bush, but the image of the Burning Bush is also an emblem of the Church of Scotland.

Continuing up the tower, there is a statue of St Columba. The statue is supported by an angel who carries a banner inscribed with 'Columba'.



Events:

  • Church: Build/construction (1902 to 1904)
    People: Wllm Tennant & Fred. V Burke