St Paul's Cathedral, High Street, Dundee

National Grid Reference (NGR): NO 40440 30290, map


Address

1 High Street
Castlehill
Dundee
Scotland

Introduction

Set atop a small hillock St. Paul's is at the east edge of the city centre. In a commanding corner position it occupies the site of the former Castle. This reproduction Gothic is constructed using soft brown sandstone. K. Nichols


Description (exterior)

Completed in 1853, at a cost of £13,000 this Episcopal church was designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott. It is a very striking building, elaborate in its style and fittings. The church was built to an aristocratic Gothic Revival design. The piended roof is slated and topped with a number of weather vanes and a carved cross. It was constructed for the Evangelical Bishop Alexander Penrose Forbes. Its height of 210 ft is accentuated by its location on volcanic rock on the rising Castle Hill. Its impressive Victorian location is given greater dignity by the principal entry being approached by three large flights of steps. The striking tower and spire is adorned with arched openings, corbelled courses, a parapet and ashlar sandstone stonework. Due to the dense nature of adjoining buildings the apse and nave are almost obscured. A limited view of the transepts is available from an east facing alley. However, the south view has been saved by considerate redevelopment where wider views can be obtained by walking into the south car park. It is from this vantage point that the height of the original construction is appreciated.

The large, spacious nave is intersected by smaller transepts, with impressive traceried windows in the gabled ends. Two-stage buttresses support the nave and transepts.

J. Dowling


Description (interior)

Internally, the church is very spacious and airy, with its height accentuated. Its many windows flood the interior, while there are impressive mosaic by Salviati of Venice. The cathedral features refreshments, toilets, brochures and welcomers.


Events:

  • Cathedral: Build/construction (1853)
    People: Gilbert Scott